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Rotating asteroids typically have short rotation periods, or "spin rates". Most asteroids have rotation periods between 2 and 20 hours.[1][2] As of 2017, a group of approximately 300 bodies – most of them are stony near-Earth asteroids with small diameters of barely 1 kilometer– have an estimated period of less than 2.2 hours. According to the Minor Planet Center, most smaller bodies are thought to be rubble piles – conglomerations of smaller pieces, loosely coalesced under the influence of gravity. Bodies below a period of 2.2 hours – also known as the "cohesionless spin-barrier" – can not be merely held together by self-gravity, but must be formed of a contiguous solid, as they would fly apart otherwise.[2] Via the deduction of strength boundary limits, rotation periods give an insight into the body's internal composition, and, from its degree of fracture, its collisional history can be inferred.[3]

Fastest rotators Edit

# Minor planet designation Rotation period Δmag Quality
(U)
Orbit or family Spectral type Diameter
(km)
Abs. mag
(H)
Refs
(seconds) (hours)
1. 2014 RC 16 0.004389 0.10 n.a. NEO S 0.01 26.80 LCDB  · MPC
2. 2015 SV6 18 0.00490 0.74 2   NEO S 0.01 27.70 LCDB  · MPC
3. 2010 JL88 25 0.0068295 0.52 3   NEO S 0.01 26.80 LCDB  · MPC
4. 2017 EK 30 0.0083 0.30 2   NEO S 0.05 24.10 LCDB  · MPC
5. 2010 WA 31 0.0085799 0.22 3   NEO S 0.00 30.00 LCDB  · MPC
6. 2016 GE1 34 0.009438 0.13 2   NEO S 0.01 26.60 LCDB  · MPC
7. 2008 HJ 43 0.01185 0.80 3-  NEO S 0.02 25.80 LCDB  · MPC
8. 2009 TM8 43 0.012 n.a. NEO S 0.01 28.40 LCDB  · MPC
9. 2015 SU 46 0.0127 0.20 2-  NEO S 0.03 25.40 LCDB  · MPC
10. 2010 SK13 52 0.0144 n.a. NEO S 0.01 27.40 LCDB  · MPC
11. 2009 BF2 57 0.01593 0.80 3   NEO S 0.02 25.90 LCDB  · MPC
12. 2016 GS2 66 0.0182725 0.06 1   NEO S 0.08 23.00 LCDB  · MPC
13. 2010 TG19 70 0.0193935 1.10 3   NEO S 0.05 23.90 LCDB  · MPC
14. 2008 WA14 70 0.0195 n.a. NEO S 0.08 23.00 LCDB  · MPC


ReferencesEdit

  1. "LCDB: Summary Table Query Form". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). http://www.minorplanet.info/PHP/lcdbsummaryquery.php. Retrieved 23 March 2017. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 "About Light Curves". ALCDEF – Asteroid Lightcurve Photometry Database. http://alcdef.org. Retrieved 23 March 2017. 
  3. Ryan, Eileen V.; Ryan, W. H. (October 2010). "Rotation Rates of Very Small Near-Earth Asteroids". American Astronomical Society 42: 1086. Bibcode2010DPS....42.6003R. http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/bib_query?bibcode=2010DPS....42.6003R. Retrieved 20 September 2016.